STC-Berkeley Moves to WordPress

If this site looks different from the last time you visited, that’s because STC Berkeley volunteers rebuilt it for WordPress.

The leadership committee decided in December 2016 to replace the previous website, constructed in the early 2000s, with this WordPress-hosted site. They did so partly at the urging of STC, which wants to gather all its chapters on one server.

WordPress is an open-source content management system used by more than 60 million websites; it’s especially popular with bloggers, because of the ease of publishing new content. The Berkeley chapter’s leadership committee expects that WordPress will make it easier for the chapter to keep members informed.

The planning and building of the new site were done by Madeleine Adkins, Clarence Cromwell, Rebecca Firestone, and Nicki Davis. Jane Olivera, who reworked a site for East Bay STC, provided advice about rebuilding the site in WordPress.

Kobla Fiagbedzi, the IT manager for STC, provided a great deal of technical support for the project.

STC Members Visit the Bay Model

A photo of the Bay Model, a working replica of the San Francisco Bay and delta, built by the US Army Corps. of Engineers.

The Bay Model Visitors Center houses a two-acre working model of the San Francisco Bay and Delta. It uses timer-controlled pumps to cycle water in a carefully calibrated network of basins and channels to simulate tides and water flows in the vast, complex estuary

By Patrick Lufkin
STC Fellow and VP Membership

On June 3, a group of technical communicators and friends from around the Bay Area visited one of the area’s hidden treasures, the Bay Model in Sausalito. The excursion was organized by me and Nicki Davis, STC-Berkeley chapter president, as part of an outreach effort to increase camaraderie and cooperation among the five Bay Area STC chapters. About 30 members from various chapters participated.

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Minimalist Writing for Maximum Communication

 

May 2017 Chapter Meeting

Register now, on our reservation page

The information age is also the age of the short attention span. We typically write for people who must spend much of each day reading. Many readers would prefer a pill that puts the information in their brain. We can’t give them that—but we can strive to give them the prose equivalent of a pill, rather than the prose equivalent of a meatloaf.

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